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Interviews, 2015.01.22 Thu, by

The Balance will Change

Randian talked to Lorenzo Rudolf about his SHContemporary days and his observations of the Shanghai art scene. He also discussed the challenges (and potential) of operating in Singapore, and the reasons behind some of the curated exhibitions ArtStage has pushed in the fair. >> Read more
Interviews, 2014.09.02 Tue, by

My Generation

“My Generation: Young Chinese Artists” is New York-based critic, curator, writer and journalist Barbara Pollack’s well-chosen introduction to new Chinese art and artists. It's the first exhibition in the United States to exclusively showcase the work of the post-Reform and Opening (1978–79 onwards) generation... >> Read more
艺术家档案, 2014.03.25 Tue, by

Utopian Metropolis or Zombie Necropolis?—Filming “Haze and Fog”

From the serious to humorous, the voyeuristic to observed, the real to the imagined, “Haze and Fog” (2013) presents another collective identity of China today by commenting on the rapid construction of the contemporary metropolis... >> Read more
艺术家档案, 2014.01.06 Mon, by

Absent Pleasure: Taryn Simon

Withholding all personal emotion, Taryn Simon has erected a highly elaborate stage. The irony of this acute, deeply researched and detailed site is that it defines negative space. In this un-delineated space, imagination, empathy, curiosity, suspicion, relief, horror, awe—indeed all potential reactions—play out. >> Read more
访谈, 2013.01.15 Tue, by

I am the World, I Want to Be Forgotten: Interview with Ai Weiwei

Randian Editor Iona Whittaker in conversation with Ai Weiwei — Chinese artist, writer, filmmaker and commentator — at his Beijing studio. The year 2012 marked his release from house arrest and the film "Never Sorry".... >> Read more
访谈, 2011.05.05 Thu, by

Review of Liu Wei’s “Trilogy” — Part II

Minsheng Art Museum, Shanghai. March 20 to May 3, 2011 Liu Wei’s ‘Trilogy’ at Minsheng Art Museum, Shanghai Part II — Read Part I of this review here  The Gothic flying buttresses seem to have developed, at least partly, out of two series of work: Liu Wei’s composition of recycled windows and doors, “The Outcast,” (2007; also previously shown […] >> Read more

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